à l'allure garçonnière

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#writing

“And this doubt grows around you. This doubt is alone, it is the doubt of solitude. It is born of it, of solitude. At least the word can be named. I think a lot of people couldn’t bear what I’m saying here; they would run away. Perhaps that’s why everyone isn’t a writer. Yes. That’s it. That’s the difference. That’s the truth. Nothing else. Doubt is writing. Thus, it is also the writer. And with the writer, everyone writes. We’ve always known that.”

Marguerite Duras (via batarde)

Marguerite would have been 100 today.

“Great fashion writing doesn’t reduce everything to what is for sale, what’s hot and not. Great fashion writing looks at clothing and the uses of clothing with the same amount of cultural reverence we give a Lars von Trier movie or the U.S. Open, as something that exists, and it asks why it exists, and how it fits into its larger culture.”

– Haley Mlotek, On Lena, On Rihanna, On Kimye: The Very Necessary Death Of “Vogue” (March 24th, 2014)

Possibilities & Personhood: Selfies, Women of Color, and Healing from White Supremacy »

plastickitten:

"[WOC Selfies are] not designated for white consumption; it’s not even about my consumption - it’s about the picture being theirs and whatever they would like to do with it. It signifies humanity and personhood; away from whiteness and independent of whiteness. The possibility of being possible on one’s own terms."

I wrote a post about brown and black girl selfies, why self-representation is important, and why they’ve helped me down the road with regards to self-esteem in the face of white beauty standards. 

A love letter to all my woc friends I’ve met on the internet.

“There is no language in itself, nor are there any linguistic universals, only a throng of dialects, patois, viperslangs, and specialized languages. There is no ideal speaker-listener, any more than there is a homogeneous linguistic community. Language is, in Weinreich’s words, “an essentially heterogeneous reality.” There is no mother tongue, only a power takeover by a dominant language within political multiplicity. Language stabilizes around a parish, a bishopric, a capital. It forms a bulb. It evolves by subterranean stems and flows, along river valleys or train tracks; it spreads like a patch of oil.”

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia

(via heteroglossia)

When €˜Long-Form€™ Is Bad Form »

I’ve been thinking a lot about this lately. I don’t write as much as I used to, but I read more than ever before. There are a few points in here I take to heart: I don’t reblog/retweet links to pieces I haven’t taken the time to read in full.


“People forget that a book or codex is a technology,” reminded ambient lit artist Tan Lin in a 2012 interview in the new media art publication Rhizome (so named after Deleuze and Guattari’s “image of thought” concept). Literary types privilege the book as the ultimate form for reading. To privilege the book as reading, though—to forget that it is a technology—is analogous to forgetting one has a body (something lit types are also wont to do), and to forget one has a body is to let it soften and lay to waste. When you recognize the book as technology, you realize that print and screen, like body and mind, are not mutually exclusive mediums, but that they are increasingly mutually influencing.
…I wrote about the Internet & book design for Hazlitt: http://www.randomhouse.ca/hazlitt/feature/internet-killed-books-save-reading


I’ve been thinking about this a lot since I first read it last week, and left a long-winded comment to that effect. I particularly think Iris and Anaïs would be intrigued…
“People forget that a book or codex is a technology,” reminded ambient lit artist Tan Lin in a 2012 interview in the new media art publication Rhizome (so named after Deleuze and Guattari’s “image of thought” concept). Literary types privilege the book as the ultimate form for reading. To privilege the book as reading, though—to forget that it is a technology—is analogous to forgetting one has a body (something lit types are also wont to do), and to forget one has a body is to let it soften and lay to waste. When you recognize the book as technology, you realize that print and screen, like body and mind, are not mutually exclusive mediums, but that they are increasingly mutually influencing.

…I wrote about the Internet & book design for Hazlitt: http://www.randomhouse.ca/hazlitt/feature/internet-killed-books-save-reading

I’ve been thinking about this a lot since I first read it last week, and left a long-winded comment to that effect. I particularly think Iris and Anaïs would be intrigued…

heidijulavits:

THE BAUHAUS JUSTIFICATION
dear mom, the reason i write all of my emails in lowercase letters isn’t because i’m rebelling against the fact that you were a high school english teacher and i never even learned how to properly use commas; it’s not because, as i often feared was the case, i suffer from low self-esteem and don’t fully believe in the merits of anything i’m writing, or, more manipulatively, because i wish to appear non-threatening and meek so as to improve my communication chances with people who need always to feel they have the UPPERCASE upper hand, even in the benign course of a casual email greeting. it is not because i am lazy. it is not because i am trying, like certain poets and people from high school, to seem unique by appearing not to give a proper grammatical fuck. it is not because i spilled coffee on my SHIFT key. it is not because we no longer care about the same things. it is apparently  because i am just so busy, so very, very busy.  

I don’t write in all lowercaps anymore but did for years and this made me laugh out loud for all the (pretentious/self-recognition/right) reasons.
(Although to be honest much of it had to do with my affection for all things bell hooks after first reading her at 17 and partially with the aesthetics of it all)

heidijulavits:

THE BAUHAUS JUSTIFICATION

dear mom, the reason i write all of my emails in lowercase letters isn’t because i’m rebelling against the fact that you were a high school english teacher and i never even learned how to properly use commas; it’s not because, as i often feared was the case, i suffer from low self-esteem and don’t fully believe in the merits of anything i’m writing, or, more manipulatively, because i wish to appear non-threatening and meek so as to improve my communication chances with people who need always to feel they have the UPPERCASE upper hand, even in the benign course of a casual email greeting. it is not because i am lazy. it is not because i am trying, like certain poets and people from high school, to seem unique by appearing not to give a proper grammatical fuck. it is not because i spilled coffee on my SHIFT key. it is not because we no longer care about the same things. it is apparently  because i am just so busy, so very, very busy.  

I don’t write in all lowercaps anymore but did for years and this made me laugh out loud for all the (pretentious/self-recognition/right) reasons.

(Although to be honest much of it had to do with my affection for all things bell hooks after first reading her at 17 and partially with the aesthetics of it all)

Best of 2013

  1. An Hourglass Figure: On Photographer Francesca Woodman by Ariana Reines (April 4th, 2013)
  2. She Came to Riot by Jennifer Pan (September 25, 2013)
  3. James Salter’s A Sport and a Pastime by Sarah Nicole Prickett (May 29, 2013)
  4. George Zimmerman, Not Guilty: Blood on the Leaves by Jelani Cobb (July 13, 2013)
  5. The Violence of Organized Forgetting by Henry A. Giroux (July 22nd, 2013)
  6. Looking for Azealia’s Harlem Shake, Or How We Mistake the Politics of Obliteration for Appropriation by Nicholas Brady (March 7, 2013)
  7. The Courtesan Dies at the End by Tom Jokinen (October 9, 2013)
  8. The Disconnectionists by Nathan Jurgenson (November 13, 2013)
  9. Girl trouble: we care about young women as symbols, not as people by Laurie Penny (November 30, 2013)
  10. Boy Next Door by Stacey May Fowles (December, 2013)

This took me much longer than anticipated but better late than never is what I often tell myself. These are 10 of the best pieces I read this year. Visit my blog for a longer list. 

Don’t forget, I tag all the articles I share here “recommended reading.”

“The fashion world is an industry that largely incorporates non-white people only as the labor to hem and stitch and toil and nothing else. Certain bodies belong and others do not. Anything that differs from this structure must be an affront to its natural order. In fashion, it is inherently “not good” and “not right” because it is different. It is not white.”

For fashion, if it’s all white, it’s all right: Kanye West’s recent ‘fashion rants’ about the industry’s racism and classism are necessary by Britt Julious (November 4, 2013)