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Link roundup: reaction to Walker’s A Subtlelty

Kara Walker’s work A Subtlelty, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby an Homage to the unpaid and overworked Artisans who have refined our Sweet tastes from the cane fields to the Kitchens of the New World on the Occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant has people talking. As a white person who shared images of it here, I thought it was important to follow up.

First and foremost I recommend listening to Kara Walker’s intentions with this piece. This is a captivating conversation with Eleanor Wachtel as she finished working on A SubtleltyWachtel On The Arts - Kara Walker. If you’re not a radio person, there’s a 10 minute video here.

Then you should read these:

anuraglahiri:

Yuri Kochiyama is a Japanese American human rights activist, but often remembered for her work in The Black Panther Party.In 1960, Kochiyama and her spouse moved to Harlem in New York City and joined the Harlem Parents Committee. She became acquainted with Malcolm X and was a member of his Organization of Afro-American Unity. She was also present at Malcolm X’s assassination on February 21, 1965, at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem, and held him in her arms as he lay dying.In 1977, Kochiyama joined the group of Puerto Ricans that took over the Statue of Liberty to draw attention to the struggle for Puerto Rican independence.Over the years, Kochiyama has dedicated herself to various causes, such as the rights of political prisoners, freeing Mumia Abu-Jamal, nuclear disarmament, and reparations to Japanese Americans who were interned during the war.In 2005, Kochiyama was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize through the “1,000 Women for the Nobel Peace Prize 2005” project.

anuraglahiri:

Yuri Kochiyama is a Japanese American human rights activist, but often remembered for her work in The Black Panther Party.

In 1960, Kochiyama and her spouse moved to Harlem in New York City and joined the Harlem Parents Committee. She became acquainted with Malcolm X and was a member of his Organization of Afro-American Unity. She was also present at Malcolm X’s assassination on February 21, 1965, at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem, and held him in her arms as he lay dying.

In 1977, Kochiyama joined the group of Puerto Ricans that took over the Statue of Liberty to draw attention to the struggle for Puerto Rican independence.

Over the years, Kochiyama has dedicated herself to various causes, such as the rights of political prisoners, freeing Mumia Abu-Jamal, nuclear disarmament, and reparations to Japanese Americans who were interned during the war.

In 2005, Kochiyama was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize through the “1,000 Women for the Nobel Peace Prize 2005” project.

Dancers from the First American Negro Ballet founded in 1937( via)

I’d seen a cropped version of the last photo once before, but this series is just stunning,

heavenrants:

creativetime:

The cat is out of the bag! The New York Times previews Kara Walker’s upcoming exhibition, which opens May 10 at the Domino Sugar Factory.

“Rising to the rafters and stretching 75 feet from paws to rump is a great sphinx, demure as her Egyptian cousin but glowing from a recent sugar coating. It is a sight so unlikely it seems Photoshopped.”

We can’t wait to share it with all of you!

“Sugar crystallizes something in our American Soul. It is emblematic of all Industrial Processes. And of the idea of becoming white. White Being equated with pure and ‘true’ it takes a lot of energy to turn brown things into white things. A lot of pressure.” — Kara Walker

Possibilities & Personhood: Selfies, Women of Color, and Healing from White Supremacy »

plastickitten:

"[WOC Selfies are] not designated for white consumption; it’s not even about my consumption - it’s about the picture being theirs and whatever they would like to do with it. It signifies humanity and personhood; away from whiteness and independent of whiteness. The possibility of being possible on one’s own terms."

I wrote a post about brown and black girl selfies, why self-representation is important, and why they’ve helped me down the road with regards to self-esteem in the face of white beauty standards. 

A love letter to all my woc friends I’ve met on the internet.


indigenousnationhoodmovement:

NEW POST: "I Am Accountable to Loretta Saunders" - by Sarah Hunt
"We are connected through our grief and our collective resistance to this terror which targets our relations. We are linked through our sense of urgency to stop this violence from continuing and to change the society in which this terror is normalized."

Sarah Hunt has been writing about these issues for years, which makes this particular piece even more hardhitting. Hunt points out exactly how the government often blames Native women themselves for their deaths and disappearances, how dangerous our legal and social attitudes towards sex workers are, and challenges both herself and her readers to think long and hard about what justice for missing and murdered women would look like. 
In conversations with friends, I’ve been struggling to explain why and how the disappearance and death of Loretta Saunders feels bigger than just the loss of one bright, young woman who I never met. Struggling to explain to friends who don’t know any Native people, friends who didn’t really understand what Idle No More was/is about, friends who never heard the word “colonialism” in their day to day lives. Trying to explain while I’m still trying to understand myself.
Hunt brings her wealth of knowledge, resources and experience together in this heartwrenching piece. She takes us to task, wondering if asking for a government inquiry is really a step forward:

Appealing to the same government that removes our children from our homes, takes our land for resource extraction, and denies our own legal jurisdiction over our homelands and households does not make sense to me. Is Harper really the source of solutions to violence against our aunties?

The missing, the murdered, Loretta Saunders… these are the stories keeping me awake at night. But I find a small amount of solace in Sarah Hunt’s words, and in the actions of hardworking community organizers, writers, resisters like her. People like her cousins who gathered in Ottawa a week after the news of her death was announced. Her cousins who reminded us the words she lived by, “Speak the truth, even if your voice shakes.” Cheers to the very few politicians, like Charlie Angus, Romeo Saganash, and Nikki Ashton, who are trying their best to represent the voices of the missing, the stories of the families who mourn and miss them, all in the hopes of challenging the dysfunctional political systems they work within.
I’m trying to find hope.

indigenousnationhoodmovement:

NEW POST: "I Am Accountable to Loretta Saunders" - by Sarah Hunt

"We are connected through our grief and our collective resistance to this terror which targets our relations. We are linked through our sense of urgency to stop this violence from continuing and to change the society in which this terror is normalized."

Sarah Hunt has been writing about these issues for years, which makes this particular piece even more hardhitting. Hunt points out exactly how the government often blames Native women themselves for their deaths and disappearances, how dangerous our legal and social attitudes towards sex workers are, and challenges both herself and her readers to think long and hard about what justice for missing and murdered women would look like.

In conversations with friends, I’ve been struggling to explain why and how the disappearance and death of Loretta Saunders feels bigger than just the loss of one bright, young woman who I never met. Struggling to explain to friends who don’t know any Native people, friends who didn’t really understand what Idle No More was/is about, friends who never heard the word “colonialism” in their day to day lives. Trying to explain while I’m still trying to understand myself.

Hunt brings her wealth of knowledge, resources and experience together in this heartwrenching piece. She takes us to task, wondering if asking for a government inquiry is really a step forward:

Appealing to the same government that removes our children from our homes, takes our land for resource extraction, and denies our own legal jurisdiction over our homelands and households does not make sense to me. Is Harper really the source of solutions to violence against our aunties?

The missing, the murdered, Loretta Saunders… these are the stories keeping me awake at night. But I find a small amount of solace in Sarah Hunt’s words, and in the actions of hardworking community organizers, writers, resisters like her. People like her cousins who gathered in Ottawa a week after the news of her death was announced. Her cousins who reminded us the words she lived by, “Speak the truth, even if your voice shakes.” Cheers to the very few politicians, like Charlie Angus, Romeo Saganash, and Nikki Ashton, who are trying their best to represent the voices of the missing, the stories of the families who mourn and miss them, all in the hopes of challenging the dysfunctional political systems they work within.

I’m trying to find hope.

vintageblackglamour:

Zora Neale Hurston was born 123 years ago today, January 7, 1891 in Notasulga, Alabama and raised in the legendary all-black town of Eatonville, Florida. She made the following observation in her 1950 essay, What White Publishers Won’t Print. ”For various reasons, the average, struggling, non-morbid Negro is the best-kept secret in America. His revelation to the public is the thing needed to do away with that feeling of difference which inspires fear, and which ever expresses itself in dislike. It is inevitable that this knowledge will destroy many illusions and romantic traditions which America probably likes to have around. But then, we have no record of anybody sinking into a lingering death on finding out that there was no Santa Claus. The old world will take it in its stride. The realization that Negroes are no better nor no worse, and at times just as bonny as everybody else, will hardly kill off the population of the nation.” This rare color photograph of Ms. Hurston was taken by Carl Van Vechten in 1940. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

vintageblackglamour:

Zora Neale Hurston was born 123 years ago today, January 7, 1891 in Notasulga, Alabama and raised in the legendary all-black town of Eatonville, Florida. She made the following observation in her 1950 essay, What White Publishers Won’t Print. ”For various reasons, the average, struggling, non-morbid Negro is the best-kept secret in America. His revelation to the public is the thing needed to do away with that feeling of difference which inspires fear, and which ever expresses itself in dislike. It is inevitable that this knowledge will destroy many illusions and romantic traditions which America probably likes to have around. But then, we have no record of anybody sinking into a lingering death on finding out that there was no Santa Claus. The old world will take it in its stride. The realization that Negroes are no better nor no worse, and at times just as bonny as everybody else, will hardly kill off the population of the nation.” This rare color photograph of Ms. Hurston was taken by Carl Van Vechten in 1940. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library