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#race

pushinghoopswithsticks:

noiseymusic:

The Pop Diaspora of M.I.A
One of the most entertaining and frustrating things about being a fan of M.I.A has been watching white critics struggle to articulate her style while challenging her right to the aesthetic she cultivates. Artists of color aren’t often recognized for their sophistication or intent. Rather, they’re ascribed a “primitive rawness.”
With her synthesis of diverse but connected motifs M.I.A gets dubbed “cut and paste.” Words like “patchwork,” “slapped-together,” and “scotch tape” are regularly used, and that’s from positive reviews. American critics, unsure of the cacophony of identities and experiences M.I.A offers, commonly project their own uncertainties onto her.
The reception of her albums can be charted along her public perception, which took a hit in 2010. Her increasing success hadn’t changed the tone of her antiestablishment politics and the juxtaposition made scoffing at M.I.A as fashionable as dancing to Galang had been.
Continue

I wrote about Matangi Arulpragasam and the subaltern struggle.

Do yourself a favour and read everything Ayesha has ever written about music. 

pushinghoopswithsticks:

noiseymusic:

The Pop Diaspora of M.I.A

One of the most entertaining and frustrating things about being a fan of M.I.A has been watching white critics struggle to articulate her style while challenging her right to the aesthetic she cultivates. Artists of color aren’t often recognized for their sophistication or intent. Rather, they’re ascribed a “primitive rawness.”

With her synthesis of diverse but connected motifs M.I.A gets dubbed “cut and paste.” Words like “patchwork,” “slapped-together,” and “scotch tape” are regularly used, and that’s from positive reviews. American critics, unsure of the cacophony of identities and experiences M.I.A offers, commonly project their own uncertainties onto her.

The reception of her albums can be charted along her public perception, which took a hit in 2010. Her increasing success hadn’t changed the tone of her antiestablishment politics and the juxtaposition made scoffing at M.I.A as fashionable as dancing to Galang had been.

Continue

I wrote about Matangi Arulpragasam and the subaltern struggle.

Do yourself a favour and read everything Ayesha has ever written about music. 

popca:

queennubian:

Steve McQueen suffering fools at TIFF 2013 (x)

His facial expressions in all these shots though.

hahahaha yo for real. his facial expressions. 

I don’t reblog .gifs often (for many reasons) but I will make an exception for this. The VERY FIRST question the moderator opens with is “Can we talk about race in America?” (asked in a much more muddled, uncomfortable fashion) and McQueen’s reaction was identical to mine: “That’s a question about 12 Years a Slave, is it?”

This is painful but very telling about racism in Hollywood.

Also McQueen’s expressions are fucking gold.

“Some problems we share as women, some we do not. You [white women] fear your children will grow up to join the patriarchy and testify against you; we fear our children will be dragged from a car and shot down in the street, and you will turn your backs on the reasons they are dying.”

– Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference” (via kawahineaihonua)

“In the psychic moving stream of Tumblr, teen girls build and perform their individual aesthetics, which are not anonymous, even if individual images are not interacted with in the same reverent (or highly art-critical) way with which one might encounter a Monet in a museum. The teen-girl Tumblr aesthetic is less about an individual image that might be dissected and praised or excellence in a specific medium, and more about “articulating a point of view.””

The Teen-Girl Tumblr Aesthetic by Alicia Eler and Kate Durbin (March 1, 2013)

TRIGGER WARNING article discussions of death, violence against women, online harrasment, aaaand quotes lena dunham for no particular reason.

I found this article equal parts baffling, super important and way too intense. It took me three tries to make it to the end, and I can’t get past the fact that they used the death of a young woman as the declencheur for this conversation.

I also wonder how distorted my own visions of these topics are since I’ve only been using Tumblr since the age of 22. Not to mention how sick I am of people lauding/touting Molly Soda as representative of this so-called “Teen-Girl Tumblr Aesthetic.” “Tumblr-famous tEEN GuRL?” She’s 23. Bitch was on livejournal just like the rest of us, never used Tumblr as a diary or a tumblelog in the traditional sense, but as a hyper-parodic art school experiment exploring notions of girlhood. The more people talk about her, the more people talk about her and convince themselves she is some sort of elected representative of every teen girl on tumblr ever? When in fact, she’s mostly mocking it? Snore.

Also, very curious about the absolute absence of discussions around race in this piece… the central figure is Asian, but that is not addressed at all. This is compounded by the fact that all of the images and examples used are very much centered around whiteness and white privilege. There have been countless important discussions challenging the way white young women in these online spaces react in knee-jerk ways to being challenged to at least address these questions. Not to mention, more importantly, how many POC resist those dominant scripts by creating and sharing their own images, giving voice to “girls like them” in a way that hadn’t been nearly as accessible/widespread a few short years ago.

I’ve got lots of feelings, most of them not good. Like, knot in the pit of my stomach not good.

woc-resist:

deeplezstonerwitch:

glitterlion:

I want to talk about intimacy. I want to talk about desire. I want to talk about fucking. I want to talk about touch.

I want to talk about how Black and Brown bodies are denied these things. I want to talk about how Black and Brown bodies thirst for these things. I want to talk about how whiteness constructs Black and Brown bodies in opposition to these things.

I want to talk about how Black and Brown bodies are rejected by other Black and Brown bodies. I want to talk about how we can’t always find comfort in each other because we’re so busy finding comfort in whiteness.

I want to talk about how Black and Brown bodies tear themselves a part for these these things. I want to talk about how Black and Brown bodies struggle for these things. I want to talk about how it’s never enough.

I want to talk about intimacy. I want to talk about desire. I want to talk about fucking. I want to talk about touch.

i find myself thinking about this so often. 

said it so well.

jomc:

Can the camera be racist? The question is explored in an exhibition that reflects on how Polaroid built an efficient tool for South Africa’s apartheid regime to photograph and police black people.
The London-based artists Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin spent a month in South Africa taking pictures on decades-old film that had been engineered with only white faces in mind. They used Polaroid’s vintage ID-2 camera, which had a “boost” button to increase the flash – enabling it to be used to photograph black people for the notorious passbooks, or “dompas”, that allowed the state to control their movements.
The result was raw snaps of some of the country’s most beautiful flora and fauna from regions such as the Garden Route and the Karoo, an attempt by the artists to subvert what they say was the camera’s original, sinister intent.
Broomberg and Chanarin say their work, on show at Johannesburg’s Goodman Gallery, examines “the radical notion that prejudice might be inherent in the medium of photography itself”. They argue that early colour film was predicated on white skin: in 1977, when Jean-Luc Godard was invited on an assignment to Mozambique, he refused to use Kodak film on the grounds that the stock was inherently “racist”.
The light range was so narrow, Broomberg said, that “if you exposed film for a white kid, the black kid sitting next to him would be rendered invisible except for the whites of his eyes and teeth”. It was only when Kodak’s two biggest clients – the confectionary and furniture industries – complained that dark chocolate and dark furniture were losing out that it came up with a solution.
The artists feel certain that the ID-2 camera and its boost button were Polaroid’s answer to South Africa’s very specific need. “Black skin absorbs 42% more light. The button boosts the flash exactly 42%,” Broomberg explained. “It makes me believe it was designed for this purpose.” (via ‘Racism’ of early colour photography explored in art exhibition | Art and design | guardian.co.uk)

holy shit.

jomc:

Can the camera be racist? The question is explored in an exhibition that reflects on how Polaroid built an efficient tool for South Africa’s apartheid regime to photograph and police black people.

The London-based artists Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin spent a month in South Africa taking pictures on decades-old film that had been engineered with only white faces in mind. They used Polaroid’s vintage ID-2 camera, which had a “boost” button to increase the flash – enabling it to be used to photograph black people for the notorious passbooks, or “dompas”, that allowed the state to control their movements.

The result was raw snaps of some of the country’s most beautiful flora and fauna from regions such as the Garden Route and the Karoo, an attempt by the artists to subvert what they say was the camera’s original, sinister intent.

Broomberg and Chanarin say their work, on show at Johannesburg’s Goodman Gallery, examines “the radical notion that prejudice might be inherent in the medium of photography itself”. They argue that early colour film was predicated on white skin: in 1977, when Jean-Luc Godard was invited on an assignment to Mozambique, he refused to use Kodak film on the grounds that the stock was inherently “racist”.

The light range was so narrow, Broomberg said, that “if you exposed film for a white kid, the black kid sitting next to him would be rendered invisible except for the whites of his eyes and teeth”. It was only when Kodak’s two biggest clients – the confectionary and furniture industries – complained that dark chocolate and dark furniture were losing out that it came up with a solution.

The artists feel certain that the ID-2 camera and its boost button were Polaroid’s answer to South Africa’s very specific need. “Black skin absorbs 42% more light. The button boosts the flash exactly 42%,” Broomberg explained. “It makes me believe it was designed for this purpose.” (via ‘Racism’ of early colour photography explored in art exhibition | Art and design | guardian.co.uk)

holy shit.

rgr-pop:

Clairol ad from Ebony, 1971
We’re rich in scans of vintage beauty ads, taken from places like Vogue and Cosmo and Seventeen. Those types of magazines didn’t really feature black women in the fifties and sixties. But of course there was black beauty commerce and culture, especially in black magazines like Ebony and Jet. In fact, as you might know, a lot of the major national brands would make one ad for white fashion magazines, one ad for white housewife magazines, maybe one ad for Life and then another ad for the black magazines. But white people aren’t exactly clamoring to pick up sixties issues of Ebony to scan and make photosets. And they certainly aren’t thinking to look for the scans of Ebony that do exist, and they certainly don’t think of Ebony as a source for “vintage fashion” or “vintage beauty” or “vintage glamor.” “Vintage culture” now is so much contingent on how the internet is used to produce, reproduce, and circulate images of vintage [women, primarily], and in the end “vintage culture” or “vintage” as a language or a shorthand becomes (remains) white.
But, still, do you know how many black women were in Vogue editorials in the early seventies? To me, it looks like there were a lot more than are in Vogue editorials now. There are a lot of reasons why white vintage is mythical.
The flickr user this came from has a lot of great Ebony scans, though! You should click through. Even better, as you may have heard, the whole Ebony archives are on google books. Their tumblr also posts stuff from there. But (given the conditions of internet rights), a lot of that stuff is of less quality than it would be if they were scans.
(Friendly reminder about vintage black glamour, of another fashion, b. vikki vintage, 16 stone vintage, probably I’m forgetting some but let me know and I’ll add ‘em.)  

rgr-pop:

Clairol ad from Ebony, 1971

We’re rich in scans of vintage beauty ads, taken from places like Vogue and Cosmo and Seventeen. Those types of magazines didn’t really feature black women in the fifties and sixties. But of course there was black beauty commerce and culture, especially in black magazines like Ebony and Jet. In fact, as you might know, a lot of the major national brands would make one ad for white fashion magazines, one ad for white housewife magazines, maybe one ad for Life and then another ad for the black magazines. But white people aren’t exactly clamoring to pick up sixties issues of Ebony to scan and make photosets. And they certainly aren’t thinking to look for the scans of Ebony that do exist, and they certainly don’t think of Ebony as a source for “vintage fashion” or “vintage beauty” or “vintage glamor.” “Vintage culture” now is so much contingent on how the internet is used to produce, reproduce, and circulate images of vintage [women, primarily], and in the end “vintage culture” or “vintage” as a language or a shorthand becomes (remains) white.

But, still, do you know how many black women were in Vogue editorials in the early seventies? To me, it looks like there were a lot more than are in Vogue editorials now. There are a lot of reasons why white vintage is mythical.

The flickr user this came from has a lot of great Ebony scans, though! You should click through. Even better, as you may have heard, the whole Ebony archives are on google books. Their tumblr also posts stuff from there. But (given the conditions of internet rights), a lot of that stuff is of less quality than it would be if they were scans.

(Friendly reminder about vintage black glamour, of another fashion, b. vikki vintage, 16 stone vintage, probably I’m forgetting some but let me know and I’ll add ‘em.)  

mytongueisforked:

People of Colour and the Quebec Student Strike

This is a detailed discussion with Students of Color Montreal and their activity within the Quebec Student strike movement.. The discussion moves through detailed discussion in regards to issues of race, exclusion, contestation, presence, visibility, love and solidarity in the Quebec Student strikes.

As Myriam Zaidi, passionately says, “White supremacy, capitalism, racism, patriarchy is all putting us on the same sinking boat…we need to be fighting together…That’s what we’re trying to do here…give the opportunity to people to see the injustices that they could not see before…seeing oppression, injustice more visibility….We just want people to start to have those lenses as well….”

I love these people. 

what becca yu has to say @3:32: PREAAAAAAACH

I WANT TO HIGH FIVE THESE FOLKS and wave a magic wand to make their massive student debt go away all at once.