à l'allure garçonnière

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#protest

fette:

Top, photograph by Luke Gilford, from the editorial L.A. Stories for V Magazine #79, Fall 2012. Via. Bottom, photograph by Adrees Latif/Reuters, A man is doused with milk after being hit with gas by security forces trying to disperse demonstrators protesting against the shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, August 2014. Via.
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The police are dealing with many more media people who want to interact with protesters very closely. I think in some ways they have difficulty separating who’s a protester, who is a media person. I mean, they’re all running around with cameras.
Robert Cohen, staff photographer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Via.
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So it comes as little surprise that some media-watchers are beginning to argue that the reporters on the ground have lost their objectivity and are now, consciously or not, aligning themselves with the protesters and against the police. As Politico’s Dylan Byers put it Tuesday, “Any journalist who stands on the front lines will inevitably be pushed, prodded or find themselves on the receiving end of a rubber bullet or tear-gas canister. In such an environment, it becomes near impossible not to identify with the protester.” Hot Air’s Noah Rothman, whose piece prompted Byers’ post, had gone even further. It is “clear that the press is no longer serving as objective chroniclers of the proceedings,” Rothman concluded after offering a few caveats about the media’s right to challenge authority. “In many ways, the media appears to believe that it is an active participant in the events in Missouri.”
Josh Voorhees, Why the Media Is Siding With the Protesters, for Slate, August 2014.
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The demand for more immediate knowledge has changed the game, and the attention market doesn’t pause for consideration — even when there are lives at stake.
 (…) It’s not just the fault of journalists, though. Now that Twitter and Instagram have brought the barriers to publication to just about zero in terms of time and resources and journalists can publish information as quickly as they can experience it, the public feels entitled to real-time information about any newsworthy event anywhere in the world. We earnestly believe we are meantto see and hear everything as it happens and that the world is always better off for our attention. Transparency becomes not a means to justice but an end in itself, and a slavish devotion to immediacy and openness undermines one of the most important journalistic virtues: discretion.
Malcom Harris, Unethical journalism can make Ferguson more dangerous, for Aljazeera, August 2014. Via.

fette:

Top, photograph by Luke Gilford, from the editorial L.A. Stories for V Magazine #79, Fall 2012. Via. Bottom, photograph by Adrees Latif/Reuters, A man is doused with milk after being hit with gas by security forces trying to disperse demonstrators protesting against the shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, August 2014. Via.

The police are dealing with many more media people who want to interact with protesters very closely. I think in some ways they have difficulty separating who’s a protester, who is a media person. I mean, they’re all running around with cameras.

Robert Cohen, staff photographer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Via.

So it comes as little surprise that some media-watchers are beginning to argue that the reporters on the ground have lost their objectivity and are now, consciously or not, aligning themselves with the protesters and against the police. As Politico’s Dylan Byers put it Tuesday, “Any journalist who stands on the front lines will inevitably be pushed, prodded or find themselves on the receiving end of a rubber bullet or tear-gas canister. In such an environment, it becomes near impossible not to identify with the protester.” Hot Air’s Noah Rothman, whose piece prompted Byers’ post, had gone even further. It is “clear that the press is no longer serving as objective chroniclers of the proceedings,” Rothman concluded after offering a few caveats about the media’s right to challenge authority. “In many ways, the media appears to believe that it is an active participant in the events in Missouri.”

Josh Voorhees, Why the Media Is Siding With the Protesters, for Slate, August 2014.

The demand for more immediate knowledge has changed the game, and the attention market doesn’t pause for consideration — even when there are lives at stake.

 (…) It’s not just the fault of journalists, though. Now that Twitter and Instagram have brought the barriers to publication to just about zero in terms of time and resources and journalists can publish information as quickly as they can experience it, the public feels entitled to real-time information about any newsworthy event anywhere in the world. We earnestly believe we are meantto see and hear everything as it happens and that the world is always better off for our attention. Transparency becomes not a means to justice but an end in itself, and a slavish devotion to immediacy and openness undermines one of the most important journalistic virtues: discretion.

Malcom Harris, Unethical journalism can make Ferguson more dangerous, for Aljazeera, August 2014. Via.

“In war, men are seen as combatants, women as victims — even if the woman was a revolutionary … For online consumers of the resulting images, the women’s suffering is the element of a conflict that those far removed from the conflict can still access. Blue-bra girl. Woman in the red dress. … Once viral, their images lose politics, lose geography, lose protest. They continue to resonate for what they gain: our sustained gaze. Like saints before them, protest’s girl martyrs are famous not because of what they did but because of what was done to them”

Riot Square Sanctificare (via nathanjurgenson)

Reminds me of some of the ideas I tried to scratch at in this piece back in 2013. 

descentintotyranny:

50,000 Bangladeshi garment workers strike over ‘inhuman’ wages

Sep. 22 2013

Tens of thousands of garment workers have downed tools and taken to the streets to urge the government for an increase in the minimum salary.

4 million employees work in the country’s $20-billion garment export industry - 60 percent goes to Europe - and earn about $38 a month. They are demanding a raise to $103 a month.

Earlier, the Bangladeshi government agreed to a 20 percent increase, but the workers called the raise "inhuman and humiliating."

"Our backs are against the wall, so we don’t have any alternative unless we raise our voice strongly," Nazma Akter, president of the United Garments Workers’ Federation told protesters. 

"We will not hesitate to do anything to realize our demand. We are not the object of mercy, the economy moves with our toll," Reuters reported her as saying.

“The rally lasted four hours and has been the largest gathering of its kind to realize their demand for raising wages,” according to Dhaka Metropolitan Police Chief Habibur Rahman.

Over 300 factories near the capital closed as employees staged a walk-out, blocking a highway and damaging a few cars.

The highway was blocked by at least 10,000 employees, according to local police. Several nearby factories were also vandalized by the protesters, which caused a halt in production.

Meanwhile, the country’s leadership has been negotiating with the demonstrators and the factory owners. The factory owners are strictly against the raise, because their Western customers are used to buying cheap clothing from them.

The last time the government increased the minimum salary was in 2010, when they almost doubled it.

In July, Bangladesh gave a boost to workers’ rights, after a factory building collapse three months earlier leaving over 1,100 people dead. Furthermore, In June, hundreds of workers were rushed to hospital after drinking contaminated water.

Bangladesh is also facing pressure from the EU, which threatened the country with sanctions, unless workers’ safety standards are improved.

hello-amber:

wornjournal:

It’s rare that a protest movement affects the way thousands of people get dressed, but the strike has done just that, turning the red square into both a symbol of solidarity and, for some, a conscious fashion statement.

Read “Seeing Red” by our Montreal Wornette, Sacha Jackson, on the WORN blog.

Lookit who it is!

click on the link to read the full article! these are really great portraits with a nice article. my friend salima punjani took some photos on june 22nd here in quebec city and the lip red square came up more than a few times:

two female protestors on june 22nd in quebec city, photo taken by Salima Punjani

i’ve been finding it really compelling to see how people have adopted the red square here in quebec. after years of recycled ribbons for various causes, it’s refreshing to see a lot of creativity coming out of this movement. if it draws more attention to the cause at the end of the day, and gets more people thinking critically, i think that’s amazing.

bing bing bang bing by benoit tardif (available as a t-shirt here)
casseroles night in canada (facebook events)
nos casseroles contre la loi speciale (facebook page, french link)
short radio piece on the noisy form of protest (may 24, 2012)
ten points everyone should know about the quebec student movement (may 14th, 2012)
rundown of some important events at the huffington post canada (may 25th, 2012)
note: many news reports refer to the “casseroles” protests as unique to montreal (the province’s largest city). it is essential to note this has been happening around the province, and did not originate in quebec (the cacerolazo are believed to have originated in the early 1970s in chile protesting against salvador allende’s government). there’s an interactive map on google maps where people can contribute locations where they’ve heard the casseroles protests.

bing bing bang bing by benoit tardif (available as a t-shirt here)

note: many news reports refer to the “casseroles” protests as unique to montreal (the province’s largest city). it is essential to note this has been happening around the province, and did not originate in quebec (the cacerolazo are believed to have originated in the early 1970s in chile protesting against salvador allende’s government). there’s an interactive map on google maps where people can contribute locations where they’ve heard the casseroles protests.

“You can’t win with them: no protest will ever be peaceful enough, docile enough, non-threatening enough to suit their wishes. Expressions of anger against the status quo will always be called disruptive, even violent. Meanwhile, we live in a system that privileges the accumulation of capital over the value of human life, and oppresses us according to our gender, race, ability, age, or class in order to sustain that accumulation. This system enacts daily violence on both those who defy it and those who simply live within it. This violence may be physical – such as the police brutality, surveillance, and disproportionate arrests experienced by student protestors and also by communities of colour, queer communities, and others on a routine basis. Or it may be less tangible but equally destructive, such as the effects of being systematically excluded from higher education, higher-paying jobs, and the possibility of economic “success.””

– Mona Luxion, quoted in Resistance is not violence: putting property damage and economic disruption in perspective at the McGill Daily (April 28th, 2012)