à l'allure garçonnière

my real blog is alagarconniere.wordpress.com.

tumblr visitor

#mirror

browntourage:

Honored to host, edit, and illustrate this dope essay on Browntourage Mag!

It’s uniquely radical when women of color of all shades and sizes, as well as gender fluid and gender variant people of color take selfies. We are manufacturing our own visibility and share their narratives in the face of erasure and forced silence. How radical is our self-love when we aren’t taught to love yourself? When we aren’t the beauty standard?

-D.K.A.Look At Me: Selfie Culture And Self-Made Visibility

READ HER FULL ESSAY ON BROWNTOURAGE —>

“‘But I never looked like that!’—How do you know? What is the ‘you’ you might or might not look like? Where do you find it—by which morphological or expressive calibration? Where is your authentic body? You are the only one who can never see yourself except as an image; you never see your eyes unless they are dulled by the gaze they rest upon the mirror or the lens (I am interested in seeing my eyes only when they look at you): even and especially for your own body, you are condemned to the repertoire of images.”

– Roland Barthes, Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes  (via starlit-mire)

having a lot of queer feelings lately about who i want to look like/what i want makeup to do


The production of propaganda textiles featuring slogans and imagery relating to the war allowed civilians to support the war effort in yet another way. Interestingly, these textiles were not produced by governments, but by independent manufacturers. In the United States and Britain, propaganda textiles featured familiar slogans such as “V for Victory” and “Keep it Under Your Hat,” a reminder that casual conversations could inadvertently reveal confidential information. Other designs featured brightly colored patterns of red, white and blue, the colors of the Allied flags. The FIDM Museum propaganda textile dress seen here features a pattern embedded with the slogan “There’ll Always be an England,” after a British patriotic song of 1939.


This collection of textiles was intentionally printed with reversed “mirror-writing,” which can be read properly only when reflected in a mirror… The mirror-writing also had an immediate effect on the wearer; every time she glanced in a mirror, she was confronted with a cheerful, fashionable reminder of her patriotic duty.

WOAH YOU GUYS. WOAH.

The production of propaganda textiles featuring slogans and imagery relating to the war allowed civilians to support the war effort in yet another way. Interestingly, these textiles were not produced by governments, but by independent manufacturers. In the United States and Britain, propaganda textiles featured familiar slogans such as “V for Victory” and “Keep it Under Your Hat,” a reminder that casual conversations could inadvertently reveal confidential information. Other designs featured brightly colored patterns of red, white and blue, the colors of the Allied flags. The FIDM Museum propaganda textile dress seen here features a pattern embedded with the slogan “There’ll Always be an England,” after a British patriotic song of 1939.

This collection of textiles was intentionally printed with reversed “mirror-writing,” which can be read properly only when reflected in a mirror… The mirror-writing also had an immediate effect on the wearer; every time she glanced in a mirror, she was confronted with a cheerful, fashionable reminder of her patriotic duty.

WOAH YOU GUYS. WOAH.