à l'allure garçonnière

my real blog is alagarconniere.wordpress.com.

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#capitalism

…so yes, we are grateful, and yes we are humble and we are shy to complain when we’ve been acknowledged thusly- BUT HOLY SHIT AND HOLY COW- we’ve been plowing our field on the margins of weird culture for almost 20 years now, and “this scene is pretty cool but what it really fucking needs is an awards show” is not a thought that’s ever crossed our minds.

3 quick bullet-points that almost anybody could agree on maybe=

-holding a gala during a time of austerity and normalized decline is a weird thing to do.

-organizing a gala just so musicians can compete against each other for a novelty-sized cheque doesn’t serve the cause of righteous music at all.

-asking the toyota motor company to help cover the tab for that gala, during a summer where the melting northern ice caps are live-streaming on the internet, IS FUCKING INSANE, and comes across as tone-deaf to the current horrifying malaise.

these are hard times for everybody. and musicians’ blues are pretty low on the list of things in need of urgent correction BUT AND BUT if the point of this prize and party is acknowledging music-labor performed in the name of something other than quick money, well then maybe the next celebration should happen in a cruddier hall, without the corporate banners and culture overlords. and maybe a party thusly is long overdue- it would be truly nice to enjoy that hang, somewhere sometime where the point wasn’t just lazy money patting itself on the back.

– Statement from Godspeed You! Black Emperor upon winning 30K Polaris Prize. Respect.

"Freaky" is so often just masked cultural appropriation

virulentflowers:

So the new Die Antwoord video seriously has Yo-Landi in full blackface and throwing around racial slurs like she’s not a whitey standing on colonized land.  Super “freaky,” right?

It’s disheartening how queers will back straight, white artists as long as they present some “freaky” aesthetic.  I’ve already written about Grimes and how frustrated I am that queers constitute her most rabid fanbase, despite the fact that she utilizes highly-problematic cultural appropriation under the guise of being “weird.”

We’re a target market and these artists and the business interests that back them profit from mining the queer subculture for signifiers to get us to latch on to the art of straight cis white artists (Madonna=Lady Gaga=Grimes).  When you are putting your interests with artists who are essentially a minstrel show, you cannot create subcultural spaces that actively confront racism, heterosexism, cissexism, and capitalism.

What we’re moving toward is the same ironic disconnect we’ve criticized hipsters for.  We replace materially confronting/destroying the structures of domination with extracting the most superficial aesthetics from actual revolutionary struggles.  We substitute a recognition of how fucked things are with an aloof commodity fetishism.

Can we stop with the idolization any conventionally attractive, straight, white, cis “artist” whose emptiness is apparent when you strip away the artifice of “weirdness?”  Can we support artists whose voices are excluded from the dominant queer subcultural hierarchy, and who confront the “art as business” model?  With the amount of confrontational, anti-capitalist queer cultural production happening, the funneling of our money, time, and support into these business people masquerading as artists is unjustifiable.

I’m sick of talking about teen culture while people are dying and I’m sick of tolerating artists who dress up as the corpses.

^^^^^^^^^^

“Young women’s involvement in online DIY cultures and in social networking can illustrate how they are using new technologies to grapple with shifting boundaries between public and private, their interpellation as consumer citizens, the contraction of a traditional public sphere—in particular the absence of spaces for critique, self-expression and peer dialogue—and a loss of faith in conventional politics and formal political institutions…However, in some manifestations, they also reveals the difficulties of contending with the kinds of citizens young women are rewarded for being: consumption-focused and on display.”

- Anita Harris, Next Wave Cultures: Feminism, Subcultures, Activism (2008)

This addresses a big concern of mine that’s also being discussed really intelligently in the blogosphere- the feminist embrace of the individual fashion blog and the simultaneous frustration over the increasing homogenization/commercialization of that platform.

(via violetthursdays)

need to read this book.

IF ONLY THIS WERE ACTUALLY SARCASTIC/A PARODY

BUY YOUR WAY TO A VERY LIMITED IDEA OF BEAUTY

CAPITALISM AT ITS FUCKING FINEST

I WANT TO RIP MY EYES OUT

I WISH I COULD LAUGH BUT I JUST WANT TO BARF

ALL OVER THIS

QUESTION TIME!

hey internet! what are your favourite vintage shop blogs? what do you want/expect from a good (brick and mortar) vintage shop’s online presence?

  1. photos of what is in the store
  2. photos of people who work there/customers
  3. advance notice for sales/specials/events
  4. links to other cool stuff/shops/bloggers
  5. anything else?

what do you want?

i am in love with this project and hope to do something similar in québec city one day:
ARTUNG! TURNS 200 MONTREAL ADS INTO WORKS OF ART
Montreal, May 31st,  2011 – 100 ad pillars and billboards across Montreal, owned by  Pattison, CBS Outdoor and Astral Media were replaced today with  community artwork. Artwork was created by 200 Canadian and International  artists and installed by fifty public space activists operating under  the name Artung!.
“Today, we transformed Montreal’s outdoor ads into public works of art to send a message to advertising giants: to  stop threatening residents of the Plateau with an unnecessary legal  battle and immediately remove their visual pollution from the whole of  Montreal’s cityscape,” said Vanessa Moraless, an Artung! campaigner.
Artung!'s action comes in response to threats made by Montreal's advertising giants to take the democratically elected Plateau Mont-Royal council to court  for a November 2010 decision to ban 45 billboards in the borough.  Jeannot Lefebvre, the industry spokesperson, argues the ban goes against  the advertising companies’ right to freedom of expression and they’ll  legally pursue it until it is reversed.
According to Projet Montreal, each  billboard only generates $1,000 in taxes for the city, an insignificant  amount of revenue compared to profits made by these multi-national  outdoor advertisers. Artung! supports the borough’s decision to take action against billboards and the 78% of residents of the Plateau who favoured the ban.
“Everyday we are forced to face  advertising eyesores and the reminder that our streets have become more  of a corporate canvass than a community space. A billboard-free  environment will set a more human rhythm for Montreal’s urban  landscape,” said Pascale Brunet, an Artung! campaigner.
Artung! encourages all Montreal  boroughs to take the same steps to ban billboards and  make Montreal the  first Canadian city to be billboard-free. Maine, Vermont and Sao Paolo  are just a few other cities and states have already banned billboards  globally.

i am in love with this project and hope to do something similar in québec city one day:

ARTUNG! TURNS 200 MONTREAL ADS INTO WORKS OF ART

Montreal, May 31st, 2011 – 100 ad pillars and billboards across Montreal, owned by Pattison, CBS Outdoor and Astral Media were replaced today with community artwork. Artwork was created by 200 Canadian and International artists and installed by fifty public space activists operating under the name Artung!.

“Today, we transformed Montreal’s outdoor ads into public works of art to send a message to advertising giants: to stop threatening residents of the Plateau with an unnecessary legal battle and immediately remove their visual pollution from the whole of Montreal’s cityscape,” said Vanessa Moraless, an Artung! campaigner.

Artung!'s action comes in response to threats made by Montreal's advertising giants to take the democratically elected Plateau Mont-Royal council to court for a November 2010 decision to ban 45 billboards in the borough. Jeannot Lefebvre, the industry spokesperson, argues the ban goes against the advertising companies’ right to freedom of expression and they’ll legally pursue it until it is reversed.

According to Projet Montreal, each billboard only generates $1,000 in taxes for the city, an insignificant amount of revenue compared to profits made by these multi-national outdoor advertisers. Artung! supports the borough’s decision to take action against billboards and the 78% of residents of the Plateau who favoured the ban.

“Everyday we are forced to face advertising eyesores and the reminder that our streets have become more of a corporate canvass than a community space. A billboard-free environment will set a more human rhythm for Montreal’s urban landscape,” said Pascale Brunet, an Artung! campaigner.

Artung! encourages all Montreal boroughs to take the same steps to ban billboards and make Montreal the first Canadian city to be billboard-free. Maine, Vermont and Sao Paolo are just a few other cities and states have already banned billboards globally.

sum1:

Apple - Hungry Beast

elmokeep:

Sources:

Apple’s ‘Think Different’ advertising campaign. Apple surpasses Microsoft^ as the world’s number one tech company. I’m a Mac. 10 workers commit suicide at Foxconn hardware contractors in China. After an Apple enquiry, Foxconn introduces counseling, cuts worker’s weeks to 60 hours, and strings nets to catch suicide attempts. 137 Wintek (contractor) workers get sick as a result of working with the n-hexane chemical. These workers say Apple is lying when it claims that they all were since cured, and say that neither Wintek, nor Apple have paid for follow-up medical treatment.

Many of your gadgets are built on third world labour. One estimate calculated that if iPads were built by American workers, they would retail for $14, 970 each. 

iTunes blocks apps which donate straight to charities. Apple has had no philanthropic division since it was shut by Steve Jobs in 1997*. Jobs has been called to answer a class action lawsuit accusing Apple of an iTunes monopoly. Apple takes 30% of all content sold through iTunes, and has launched its subscription service, which will also take 30% from publishers. Apple freezes Adobe’s Flash out of its devices. Adobe capitulates.

1984 looks a lot like 2011.

^Microsoft discontinues its iPod competitor, the Zune.

*Apple is one of the least philanthropic companies in the world

Motion graphics by Duncan Elms. Edited by Nick McDougall. Written by Elmo Keep. 

i never know exactly how i feel about videos like these ones: videos that call attention to serious problems (mostly re: capitalism) made with flashy techniques and design and type that often end without a real call to action. and this doesn’t even begin to address the environmental impact of mining for conflict minerals that are used in all of these electronics, or the “design for the dump” mentality. in fact, this seems like more of a criciticism of apple’s hypocritical ad campaigns vs. the reality, rather than the fact that the wasteful consumer-driven world of electronics is becoming a rather unstoppable beast, in the sense that people will buy without questioning where their goods come from (as opposed to the increasing trends of informing yourself re: food and clothing choices). 

but that’s where i think part of my problem with videos like this one lies: they are designed for short attention spans, web based sharing and are often 2-3 minutes long. i don’t think you can (or should try to) address these complicated problems in that amount of time, or even in that medium. if it is a starting point for conversations in a workshop? classroom? community center? maybe. but it just never feels like enough for me because it doesn’t seem to get to the roots of the problem(s). it’s really easily to just villify one company represented by one man, as opposed to confronting the system as being the problem.

anyway. i’m reblogging this anyway because it’s definitely something that gets swept under the rug all too often.

if you’re interested in learning more, i would recommend checking out the “enough!” project (but at the same time i feel like this isn’t really all that efficient when i think the system itself is broken and i want a revolution but maybe that’s just me and you might find it helpful/inspiring). here are some other links:

LINKS:

vladislava:

(via realpeterjette)
EVERYTHING IS FINE.KEEP SHOPPING.

we interrupt this fashion spam for some public space reclaiming:
i can’t believe how many people reblogged this with shit like “can’t wait for payday!!!!!” and “and do that i will! :) “
this is art, this is activism, this is reclaiming public space… but YAY CAPITALISM CONSUMERISM!!!!
for the record, this is not an ad. i know, surreal, eh? this is part of a project called “Public Ad Campaign” and this image is from the Madrid Street Ad takeover. 106 artists were called to participate, writing in any language they wanted, and a guerilla team took to the streets in the wee hours of the morning to replace ads with these thought-provoking texts. more photos here, more info here.
(also, i work for a small public arts company 3 days a week and i wish we did more guerilla shit like this)

vladislava:

(via realpeterjette)

EVERYTHING IS FINE.
KEEP SHOPPING.

we interrupt this fashion spam for some public space reclaiming:

i can’t believe how many people reblogged this with shit like “can’t wait for payday!!!!!” and “and do that i will! :) “

this is art, this is activism, this is reclaiming public space… but YAY CAPITALISM CONSUMERISM!!!!

for the record, this is not an ad. i know, surreal, eh? this is part of a project called “Public Ad Campaign” and this image is from the Madrid Street Ad takeover. 106 artists were called to participate, writing in any language they wanted, and a guerilla team took to the streets in the wee hours of the morning to replace ads with these thought-provoking texts. more photos here, more info here.

(also, i work for a small public arts company 3 days a week and i wish we did more guerilla shit like this)